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    14 Healthy Sources for Fats for the Keto Diet (Plus Some to Limit)

    14 Healthy Sources for Fats for the Keto Diet (Plus Some to Limit)

    14 Healthy Sources for Fats for the Keto Diet (Plus Some to Limit)

    When following a high-fat, very-low-carb ketogenic (keto) diet, it’s important to remember that not all fats are created equal.

    Some sources of fat are better for you than others, and it’s critical that you fill your plate with the most wholesome options to successfully reach your health goals.

    Here are 14 healthy sources of fat to enjoy on the keto diet.

    1. Avocados and avocado oil

    Avocados are not only an excellent source of heart-healthy fats but also provide a hefty dose of fiber and essential vitamins and minerals.

    Research suggests that avocados and their oil may support heart health, balanced blood sugar, and healthy aging. Enjoy avocado by itself, use it to make guacamole, or add it to smoothies and salads to boost fat and nutrient content. Drizzle avocado oil on grilled or steamed veggies or use it to make salad dressings and other keto-friendly sauces.

    1. Nuts

    Including different kinds of nuts in your diet is a great way to boost your intake of healthy fats, plant-based protein, and fiber.

    Additionally, a higher intake of nuts is associated with a reduced risk of heart disease and deaths associated with cancer, diabetes, and respiratory illnesses.

    Nuts differ in their nutrient composition, so eating a variety of your favorites will help you get the most benefits. Pistachios, walnuts, almonds, pecans, cashews, and Brazil nuts are all great options for low-carb, high-fat diets like keto.

    Carry mixed nuts to snack on, sprinkle them on your salads and soups, or make a nut-based spread like walnut pesto.

    1. Nut and seed butters

    Nut and seed butters offer the same benefits as eating whole nuts and seeds — but in a more versatile package.

    Spread sunflower butter over keto crackers or use almond butter as a dip for low-carb vegetables.

    Add your favorite nut butter to smoothies or use it as a base for making energy bites. You can even include nut butters in sauces and marinades for fish or veggie noodles.

    1. Flax seeds

    Flax seeds are an excellent source of anti-inflammatory omega-3 fats, fiber, and health-promoting plant compounds.

    One-quarter cup (42 grams) of flax seeds provides 11 grams of fiber, 7 grams of protein, and 18 grams of fat, half of which from omega-3s.

    Research indicates that flax seeds and their oil may help prevent heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and degenerative brain diseases. Add ground flax seeds to smoothies or sprinkle them on salads, soups, or a keto yogurt parfait. You can also incorporate whole or ground flax seeds into your favorite recipes for keto-friendly crackers, muffins, and pancakes.

    1. Hemp hearts

    Hemp hearts, or seeds, are another great, nutrient-dense option for boosting fat intake on the ketogenic diet.

    Three tablespoons (30 grams) of hemp hearts provide 15 grams of fat, making them a perfect choice for high-fat diets.

    They’re one of very few complete plant-based protein sources that contain all nine essential amino acids. Plus, they pack a variety of vitamins and minerals, including vitamin E, calcium, iron, and potassium.

    Hemp hearts have a mild flavor and a texture similar to sesame seeds, so they’re easy to mix into a variety of foods without changing the flavor profile much.

    Sprinkle them on top of yogurt, salads, and roasted vegetables, blend them into smoothies and soups, or incorporate them into energy bites. You can also add them to sauces and dressings.

    1. Chia seeds

    Chia seeds are rich in healthy fats and fiber, making them a perfect candidate for a keto diet.

    In just 1 tablespoon (15 grams) of chia seeds, you get 4 grams of fat, mostly omega-3s, as well as 4 grams of fiber, which is about 16% of the Daily Value (DV).

    These seeds also contain a variety of plant compounds, including quercetin and kaempferol, that may reduce inflammation and prevent chronic conditions, such as cancer, heart disease, and diabetes.

    Additionally, chia seeds have a unique ability to absorb water. When soaked in a liquid for a few hours, they become very gelatinous. In this form, they can be used to make chia pudding or to thicken sauces and dressings.

    Like other seeds, chia can be blended into smoothies or stirred into yogurt, soups, and salads. You can also use them to make keto-style crackers or as a breading for baked fish, chicken, or pork.

    1. Olives and cold-pressed olive oil

    The benefits of olives and olive oil have been researched for decades, and it’s no coincidence that they’re frequently included in many of the world’s healthiest diets.

    Olives are not only loaded with heart-healthy fats but also contain vitamin E and various plant compounds known to reduce inflammation and your risk of chronic conditions like heart disease, cancer, and osteoporosis.

    Olives make for a convenient and portable snack but are also great tossed into salads or eaten as part of antipasti. For an extra boost of flavor stuff the olives with garlic, pimentos, or gorgonzola cheese.

    Purée whole olives with olive oil, anchovies, and capers to make a tapenade to add fat, flavor, and moisture to veggie sandwich wraps.

    Cold-pressed extra virgin olive oil can be drizzled over grilled or lightly sautéed veggies to boost fat content or use it as a base for a dressing or marinade for roasted meats, vegetables, or fresh salad.

    1. Coconuts and unrefined coconut oil

    Coconuts and coconut oil are popular keto fat sources because they offer a natural source of medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs), a type of fat that your body can easily absorb and use.

    Research suggests that MCTs may ease your transition into ketosis, a state in which your body burns fats for fuel rather than glucose.

    What’s more, MCTs are more likely to be burned as energy and less likely to be stored as fat, which may aid weight loss.

    Add unsweetened coconut flakes to homemade trail mix or smoothies. Use full-fat coconut milk to make curried meats or roast vegetables in coconut oil. For an island-style flavor, try sautéed cauliflower rice in coconut oil and fresh lime juice.

    1. Cacao nibs

    If you think chocolate doesn’t belong in your keto diet, think again.

    Cacao nibs are a form of unsweetened, unprocessed raw chocolate. Just 1 ounce (28 grams) provides about 12 grams of fat and a whopping 9 grams of fiber.

    Dark chocolate is also well known for its rich supply of polyphenols, which are plant compounds with strong anti-inflammatory effects that may encourage the growth of healthy gut bacteria.

    Add cacao nibs to homemade smoothies, energy bites, or trail mix. If you have a sweet tooth, make keto hot chocolate by melting cacao nibs in unsweetened coconut milk on the stovetop. Then mix in your favorite keto-friendly sweetener, such as stevia or monk fruit.

    1. Full-fat Greek yogurt

    Though it contains some carbs, unsweetened, full-fat Greek yogurt can be a healthy addition to a ketogenic diet.

    A 5.3-ounce (150-gram) serving provides approximately 6 grams of fat, 13 grams of protein, and 6 grams of carbs, as well as 15% of the DV for calcium.

    Yogurt is also a great source of beneficial bacteria known as probiotics, which promote healthy digestive function.

    Eat Greek yogurt by itself or build a keto yogurt parfait by layering nuts, seeds, coconut, and cacao with it. You can also mix in herbs and spices to make a flavorful veggie dip.

    1. Fatty fish

    Fatty fish like salmon, tuna, anchovies, and sardines are great additions to a healthy ketogenic diet.

    They’re rich in high-quality protein and heart-healthy omega-3 fats. Certain types like salmon also provide a substantial dose of vitamin D, a nutrient critical for immune function, bone health, and more.

    Bake or grill a filet of wild-caught, fatty fish to serve over a salad or alongside roasted vegetables. You can also use your favorite canned fish mixed with mayonnaise, herbs, and spices to stuff lettuce wraps, avocado, or celery sticks.

    1. Whole eggs

    Eggs are as nutritious as they are versatile, making them an easy addition to a ketogenic diet.

    A single 56-gram egg packs about 5 grams of fat, 7 grams of protein, and 80 calories.

    Make sure to eat the whole egg, as the yolk is rich in B vitamins and the potent antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin, which support eye health.

    Hard-boil a batch of eggs to have as snacks throughout the week or add a little mayonnaise and turn them into egg salad. Make a scramble loaded with low-carb veggies or have poached eggs with sliced avocado and tomato.

    1. Butter

    Butter is perfect for your keto lifestyle, as it’s carb-free and about 80% fat.

    Though it was long considered a menace to heart health, current research indicates that there is only a small or neutral association between butter intake and heart disease and stroke risk.

    Butter also happens to be one of the richest food sources of butyrate. Early research suggests that this type of short-chain fat may play a significant role in promoting brain health

    Some research indicates that organic butter from grass-fed cows may have a slightly more favorable composition of fats than butter from conventionally raised cows, but whichever you choose, make sure it’s of high quality

    Roast or sauté vegetables in butter or spread it on keto-friendly muffins, waffles, or pancakes. Rub butter over a whole chicken before roasting to achieve perfectly crispy skin.

    1. Cheese

    Cheese is another good high-fat, low-carb option for keto dieters, and with hundreds of varieties on the market, there’s no shortage of options to choose from.

    Though exact nutrient composition varies depending on the type of cheese, many types are good sources of protein and calcium. Certain fermented varieties like cheddar or gouda also provide probiotics.

    Enjoy slices of cheese with fresh veggie sticks or melt it over roasted or steamed vegetables. Try adding shredded cheese to salads or grilled meats or use it to make keto mushroom pizza sliders.

    Fats to limit on keto

    Though fat makes up the majority of the calories on a ketogenic diet, not all sources of fat are good for your health — even if they fit into the macronutrient distribution of your diet plan.

    Artificial trans fats

    Artificially produced trans fats are known for significantly increasing heart disease risk and should be avoided, regardless of the type of diet you’re following.

    Trans fats are frequently found in highly refined oils and commercially prepared processed foods, such as cakes, cookies, pastries, biscuits, crackers, and other ultra-processed snacks.

    Trans fats may be indicated on an ingredient label under the names “partially hydrogenated oils” or “shortening.” It’s best to avoid foods that contain these ingredients as much as possible.

    Note that many countries, including the United States, have banned or restricted the use of artificial trans fats.

    Still, according to the current regulation of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), trans-fat-containing products manufactured before June 18, 2018 may be distributed until January 2020, or 2021 in some cases.

    What’s more, if a food provides less than 0.5 grams of trans fats per serving, it’s labeled as having 0 grams of trans fats.

    Processed meats

    Processed meats, such as deli meat, sausages, salami, hot dogs, and cured and smoked meats, are frequently advertised as keto friendly.

    While these foods technically fit into a ketogenic diet plan, several studies have found an association between high intake of processed meats and an increased risk of cancers of the digestive tract.

    Therefore, it’s best to keep your intake of these foods minimal. Instead, focus on eating whole, minimally processed foods as much as possible.

    Fried foods

    Deep-fried foods are included in some ketogenic diet plans, but you may want to think twice before adding them to yours.

    Fried foods tend to be high in trans fats, which can increase your risk of heart disease.

    Certain types of highly refined oils typically used for frying, such as corn oil, often contain small amounts of trans fats. As the oils are heated to very high temperatures, more trans fats may be produced.

    Fried food absorbs large amounts of these fats, and frequent consumption could lead to detrimental health effects over time. Therefore, keep your intake of fried foods to a minimum to support your health while following a ketogenic diet.

    SUMMARY Certain fat sources should be limited or avoided on a keto diet, as they may negatively affect your health. These include processed meats, fried foods, and anything containing artificial trans fats.

    The bottom line

    The ketogenic diet is centered around high-fat foods, but some sources of fat are healthier than others.

    Fatty fish, avocados, coconut, olives, nuts, and seeds are a few examples of nutritious sources of healthy fats.

    To best support your health on the keto diet, choose fats from nutrient-dense, whole foods and avoid those that come from ultra-processed oils, meats, and fried foods.

     

    What’s the optimal ketone level for your ketogenic diet?

    What’s the optimal ketone level for your ketogenic diet?

    As you might have suspected, there isn’t a one-size fits all answer to this question. Part of the answer depends on what your goals are.

    The optimal ketone levels you’ll want to achieve will likely be different depending on whether you’re looking to lose weight, get improved mental clarity, improve your athletics performance, or to cure/prevent illnesses like cancer. And the numbers may also vary depending on your body’s current insulin resistance (e.g., if you have type 2 diabetes or if you’re pre-diabetic then your optimal levels at the beginning might be different from someone who has healthy levels of blood glucose).

    Bearing all of those different factors in mind, below are some ranges proposed by different ketogenic diet experts.

    NOTE – again, these ketone levels are for optimal nutritional ketosis and should not be used if you’re a type 1 diabetic!

    Dr. Stephen Phinney, MD, PhD and Jeff Volek, PhD., RD

    jeff-and-steve

    Most people have based their optimal ketone numbers on the recommendations in The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance: “‘light nutritional ketosis’ is between 0.5mmol/L and 1.0mmol/L and ‘optimal ketosis’ is between 1.0mmol/L and 3.0mmol/L.”

    Dr. Thomas Seyfried

    tom-seyfried

    Dr. Thomas Seyfried, a professor of biology at Boston College who researches cancer and the uses of a ketogenic diet in curing and preventing cancer, states in the The Complete Guide to Fasting book: “The key to therapy is prolonged therapeutic ketosis (blood ketones in the range of 3–6mM), together with reduced blood glucose levels (3–4 mM).”

    Dominic D’Agostino

    dominic-dagostino

    Dominic D’Agostino is an assistant professor in University of South Florida and his lab researches how a ketogenic diet can aid neurological diseases. In a 2014 podcast with Chris Kelly from Nourish Balance Thrive, Dominic stated: “What’s the optimal level of ketones? I think anecdotally and from the data that I’ve seen, I think somewhere between 1.5 and 3 is optimal.”

    Luis Villasenor

    luis

    Luis from Ketogains.com who helps many bodybuilders on a ketogenic diet has repeatedly suggested that search for high ketone levels is not always beneficial. He regularly tells people: “don’t chase ketones; chase results.”

    Marty Kendall

    marty-kendall

    Marty, an engineer who runs the website and Facebook group, Optimising Nutrition, states that: “If your aim is exercise performance or fat loss then ketones between 0.5mmol/L and 1.3mmol/L might be all you need to aim for. I also think loading up on dietary fat at the expense of getting adequate protein, vitamins and minerals may be counterproductive in the long term.”

    Marty also points out that not everyone on a ketogenic diet will get high levels – for example, Sami Inkenen only had around 0.6mmol/L when he was rowing from the US to Hawaii on an 80% fat diet.

    As Certified Nutrition Specialist Amy Berger, CNS, NTP, says, “Don’t compare your results to someone else’s, and don’t let anyone “ketone shame” you on social media. It’s not a contest or a race. Someone might feel like a total rock star with [ketone level] at “only” 0.6, while someone else might not notice any difference unless their ketones are above 2.0. It’s entirely individual and the only competition you’re in is to feel your best.”

    Summary

    Weight-loss: above 0.5mmol/L

    Improved athletic performance: above 0.5mmol/L

    Improved mental performance: 1.5-3mmol/L

    Therapeutic (e.g., to prevent or cure certain illnesses): 3-6mmol/L

    Again, these are general ranges and if yours doesn’t fall within the range, it’s not a definitive indicator that you’re doing something wrong, but it is a helpful guide to ensure you think about tweaking and testing your keto diet to see if something can be improved.

    The above Content  is an extract from an article written by Louise Hendon and published on ketosummit.com 

    The 9 Best Keto Supplements

    The 9 Best Keto Supplements

    The 9 Best Keto Supplements

    As the popularity of the ketogenic diet continues to grow so does interest in how to optimize health while following this high-fat, low-carb eating plan.

    Because the keto diet cuts out a number of food options, it’s a good idea to supplement with specific nutrients.

    Not to mention, some supplements can help dieters reduce adverse effects of the keto flu and even enhance athletic performance when training on a low-carb diet.

    Here are the best supplements to take on a keto diet.

    1. Magnesium

    Magnesium is a mineral that boosts energy, regulates blood sugar levels and supports your immune system.

    Research suggests that due to magnesium-depleting medications, reliance on processed foods and other factors, a good portion of the population has or is at risk of developing a magnesium deficiency.

    On a ketogenic diet, it may be even more difficult to meet your magnesium needs, as many magnesium rich foods like beans and fruits are also high in carbs.

    For these reasons, taking 200–400 mg of magnesium per day may be beneficial if you’re on a keto diet.

    Supplementing with magnesium can help reduce muscle cramps, difficulty sleeping and irritability — all symptoms commonly experienced by those transitioning to a ketogenic diet.

    Some of the most absorbable forms of magnesium include magnesium glycinate, magnesium gluconate and magnesium citrate.

    If you wish to increase your magnesium intake through keto-friendly foods, focus on incorporating these low-carb, magnesium-rich options:

    • Spinach
    • Avocado
    • Swiss chard
    • Pumpkin seeds
    • Mackerel
    SUMMARY Those following a ketogenic diet may be at a higher risk of developing a magnesium deficiency. Taking a magnesium supplement or eating more low-carb, magnesium-rich foods can help you meet your daily requirements.
    2. MCT Oil

    Medium-chain triglycerides, or MCTs, are a popular supplement among keto dieters.

    They’re metabolized differently than long-chain triglycerides, the most common type of fat found in food.

    MCTs are broken down by your liver and quickly enter your bloodstream where they can be used as a fuel source for your brain and muscles.

    Coconut Oil is one of the richest natural sources of MCTs, with about 60% of its fatty acids being in the form of MCTs.

    However, taking MCT OIl (made by isolating MCTs from coconut or palm oil) provides an even more concentrated dose of MCTs and can be helpful for those following a ketogenic diet.

    Supplementing with MCT oil can help keto dieters since it can quickly up your fat intake, which increases ketone levels and helps you stay in ketosis.

    It has also been shown to promote weight loss and increase feelings of fullness, which can be helpful for those using the ketogenic diet as a weight loss tool.

    MCT oil can be easily added to shakes and smoothies or simply taken by the spoonful for a quick fat boost.

    It’s a good idea to start with a small dose (1 teaspoon or 5 ml) of MCT oil to see how your body reacts before increasing to the suggested dosage listed on the supplement bottle.

    MCT oil can cause symptoms like diarrhea and nausea in some people.

    SUMMARY MCT oil is a type of rapidly digested fat that can be used to help ketogenic dieters boost fat intake and stay in ketosis.
    3. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    Omega-3 fatty acid supplements, such as fish or krill oil, are rich in the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which benefit health in many ways.

    EPA and DHA have been found to reduce inflammation, lower heart disease risk and prevent mental decline.

    Western diets tend to be higher in omega-6 fatty acids (found in foods like vegetable oils and processed foods) and lower in omega-3s (found in fatty fish).

    This imbalance can promote inflammation in the body and has been linked to an increase in many inflammatory diseases.

    Omega-3 supplements can be particularly beneficial for people on ketogenic diets, as they can help maintain a healthy omega-3 to omega-6 ratio when following a high-fat diet.

    What’s more, omega-3 supplements can maximize the ketogenic diet’s impact on overall health.

    One study showed that people following a ketogenic diet who supplemented with omega-3 fatty acids from krill oil experienced greater decreases in triglycerides, insulin and inflammatory markers than those who did not.

    When shopping for omega-3 supplements, choose a reputable brand that provides at least a combined 500 mg of EPA and DHA per 1,000 mg serving.

    Those on blood-thinning medications should consult a doctor before taking omega-3 supplements, as they can increase your risk of bleeding by further thinning your blood.

    To boost your intake of omega-3 fatty acids through keto-friendly foods, eat more salmon, sardines and anchovies.

    SUMMARY Omega-3 fatty acid supplements can reduce inflammation, lower heart disease risk factors and help ensure a healthy balance of omega-3s to omega-6s.
    4. Vitamin D

    Having optimal levels of vitamin D is important for everyone's health, including people following ketogenic diets.

    The keto diet doesn’t necessarily put you at a higher risk of developing a vitamin D deficiency, but since vitamin D deficiency is common in general, supplementing with this vitamin is a good idea.

    Vitamin D is important for many bodily functions, including facilitating the absorption of calcium, a nutrient that could be lacking on a ketogenic diet, especially in those who are lactose intolerant.

    Vitamin D is also responsible for supporting your immune system, regulating cellular growth, promoting bone health and lowering inflammation in your body.

    Since few foods are good sources of this important vitamin, many health professionals recommend vitamin D supplements to ensure proper intake.

    Your doctor can run a blood test to determine if you’re deficient in vitamin D and help prescribe a proper dosage based on your needs.

    SUMMARY Since vitamin D deficiency is common, it may be a good idea for people following the ketogenic diet to get their vitamin D levels checked and supplement accordingly.
    5. Digestive Enzymes

    One of the main complaints of those new to the ketogenic diet is that the high fat content of this eating pattern is tough on their digestive system.

    Since the keto diet usually consists of up to 75% fat, those used to consuming diets lower in fat can experience unpleasant gastrointestinal symptoms like nausea and diarrhea.

    In addition, though the ketogenic diet is only moderate in protein, it may still be a higher amount than some people are used to, which can also cause digestive side effects.

    If you’re experiencing digestive issues like nausea, diarrhea and bloating when transitioning to a ketogenic diet, a digestive enzyme blend that contains enzymes that break down fats (lipases) and proteins (proteases) may help optimize digestion.

    What's more, proteolytic enzymes, which are enzymes that help break down and digest protein, have been shown to reduce post-workout soreness, which can be a bonus for workout enthusiasts on a keto diet.

    SUMMARY Taking a digestive supplement that contains both protease and lipase enzymes, which break down protein and fat respectively, may help relieve digestive symptoms related to transitioning to a keto diet.
    6. Exogenous Ketones

    Exogenous ketones are ketones supplied through an external source, while endogenous ketones are the type produced naturally by your body through a process called ketogenesis.

    Exogenous ketone supplements are commonly used by those following a ketogenic diet to increase blood ketone levels.

    Aside from potentially helping you reach ketosis quicker, exogenous ketone supplements have been linked to other benefits as well.

    For example, they have been shown to boost athletic performance, speed muscle recovery and decrease appetite.

    However, research on exogenous ketones is limited, and many experts argue that these supplements aren’t necessary for keto dieters.

    Additionally, most of the studies on exogenous ketones used a more powerful type of exogenous ketones called ketone esters, not ketone salts, which is the most common form found in supplements available to consumers.

    While some people may find these supplements helpful, more research is needed to establish their potential benefits and risks.

    SUMMARY Exogenous ketones may help raise ketone levels, decrease appetite and increase athletic performance. However, more research is needed to establish the effectiveness of these supplements.
    7. Greens Powder

    Increasing vegetable intake is something that everyone should focus on.

    Vegetables contain a wide variety of vitamins, minerals and powerful plant compounds that can fight inflammation, lower disease risk and help your body function at optimal levels.

    Though not everyone following a keto diet is necessarily lacking in their vegetable intake, this eating plan does make it more difficult to consume enough plant foods.

    A quick and easy way to boost your vegetable intake is by adding a greens powder to your supplement regimen.

    Most greens powders contain a mixture of powdered plants like spinach, spirulina, chlorella, kale, broccoli, wheatgrass and more.

    Greens powders can be added to drinks, shakes and smoothies, making them a convenient way to increase your intake of healthy produce.

    Those following ketogenic diets can also focus on adding more whole-food, low-carb vegetables to their meals and snacks.

    While it shouldn't be used as a replacement for fresh produce, a well-balanced greens powder is an excellent and easy way for keto dieters to add a nutrient boost to their meal plan.

    SUMMARY Greens powders contain powdered forms of healthy plants like spinach, spirulina and kale. They can provide a convenient source of nutrients to those following ketogenic diets.
    8. Electrolyte Supplements or Mineral-Rich Foods

    Focusing on adding minerals through diet is important for people following a ketogenic diet, especially when first switching to this way of eating.

    The first weeks can be challenging as the body adapts to the very low number of carbs consumed.

    Transitioning to a ketogenic diet results in increased water loss from the body.

    Levels of sodium, potassium and magnesium can drop as well, leading to symptoms of the keto flu, such as headaches, muscle cramps and fatigue.

    Additionally, athletes following a keto diet may experience even greater fluid and electrolyte losses through sweating.

    Adding sodium through diet is the best strategy. Simply salting foods or sipping on a broth made with bouillon cubes should cover most people’s increased sodium needs.

    Increasing your intake of potassium- and magnesium-rich foods can counteract losses of these important minerals, too.

    Dark leafy greens, nuts, avocados and seeds are all keto-friendly foods that are high in both magnesium and potassium.

    Electrolyte supplements containing sodium, potassium and magnesium are available as well.

    SUMMARY People following a ketogenic diet should focus on increasing their consumption of sodium, potassium and magnesium to prevent unpleasant symptoms like headache, muscle cramps and fatigue.
    9. Supplements to Boost Athletic Performance

    Athletes looking to boost performance while on a ketogenic diet may benefit from taking the following supplements:

    • Creatine monohydrate: Creatine monohydrate is an extensively researched dietary supplement that has been shown to promote muscle gain, improve exercise performance and increase strength.
    • Caffeine: An extra cup of coffee or green tea can benefit athletic performance and boost energy levels, especially in athletes transitioning to a keto diet.
    • Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs): Branched-chain amino acid supplements have been found to reduce exercise-related muscle damage, muscle soreness and fatigue during exercise.
    • HMB (beta-hydroxy beta-methylbutyrate): HMB may help decrease muscle loss and increase muscle mass, especially in those who are just beginning an exercise program or increasing the intensity of their workouts.
    • Beta-alanine: Supplementing with the amino acid beta-alanine may help prevent fatigue and muscle burnout when following a ketogenic diet.
    SUMMARY Athletes following a ketogenic diet may benefit from certain supplements that preserve muscle mass, boost performance and prevent fatigue.
    The Bottom Line

    The high-fat, low-carb ketogenic diet is followed for various reasons, from promoting weight loss to boosting athletic performance.

    Some supplements can make the transition to this way of eating easier and help reduce symptoms of the keto flu.

    What’s more, many supplements can improve the nutritional value of a ketogenic diet plan and even enhance athletic performance.

    Taking these supplements can help optimize nutrition and allow you to thrive while on a keto diet.

    Author - Jillian Kubala MS RD

    www.healthline.com